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Former Trump chief of staff Meadows agrees to cooperate with Jan. 6 panel

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Former Trump chief of staff Meadows agrees to cooperate with Jan. 6 panel
© Reuters. FILE PHOTO: White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows speaks to reporters following a television interview, outside the White House in Washington, U.S. October 21, 2020. REUTERS/Al Drago

By Patricia Zengerle

WASHINGTON (Reuters) -The House of Representatives committee investigating the deadly U.S. Capitol riot said on Tuesday that Mark Meadows, who served as former President Donald Trump’s chief of staff, has provided it with records and agreed to appear “soon” for a deposition.

“Mr. Meadows has been engaging with the Select Committee through his attorney. He has produced records to the committee and will soon appear for an initial deposition,” Democratic Representative Bennie Thompson, chairman of the House select committee, said in a statement.

Noting that the panel expects all witnesses to provide all the information requested and that it is lawfully entitled to received, Thompson added: “The committee will continue to assess his degree of compliance with our subpoena after the deposition.”

Trump has urged associates not to cooperate with the committee, calling the Democratic-led investigation politically motivated and arguing that his communications are protected by executive privilege, although many legal experts say that principle does not apply to former presidents.

On Jan. 6, Trump supporters stormed the Capitol in a bid to prevent Congress from formally certifying his 2020 presidential election loss to Democrat Joe Biden. Shortly before the riot, Trump gave a speech to his supporters repeating his false claims that the election was stolen from him through widespread voting fraud and urging them to go to the Capitol and “fight like hell” to “stop the steal.”

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Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.

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EPA withdraws Trump Oklahoma environment order after input from tribes

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EPA withdraws Trump Oklahoma environment order after input from tribes
© Reuters. A woman from Dancing Eagles dance troupe from the Osage and Creek tribes performs a dance at an Indian relay race over Memorial Day weekend in Pawhuska, Oklahoma, U.S., May 29, 2021. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

By Valerie Volcovici

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced on Wednesday it plans to withdraw and reconsider a Trump administration decision to grant Oklahoma authority over environmental issues on tribal land after consulting with the state’s 38 tribal nations.

The agency would reverse a decision made in October 2020 by then-EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler, who approved a request from Republican Oklahoma Governor Kevin Stitt to allow the state rather than tribal nations to regulate environmental issues on land inside historical tribal reservation boundaries.

Stitt’s had requested the authority in July 2020 after the Supreme Court ruled 5-4 in the landmark McGirt v. Oklahoma case that a large part of eastern part of the state would be considered Muscogee (Creek) Nation reservation land. The McGirt v. Oklahoma case focused on a question of criminal jurisdiction.

“Our sovereign Tribal partners continue to have significant concerns with EPA’s previous decision and the consultation process used in reaching that decision,” said Assistant Administrator for International and Tribal Affairs Jane Nishida. “Today’s action reflects careful consideration of their concerns and our commitment to ensuring robust consultation on all policy deliberations affecting Tribal nations.”

The Biden administration began informal talks with Oklahoma tribes over whether they should have a bigger say over a range of environmental regulations in the eastern half of the oil-rich state in April. It began formal government-to-government tribal consultations in June.

Tribes had complained that they had not been consulted with before the Trump administration made its decision.

Oklahoma Republican government sources told Reuters in April that it was concerned the state risks losing control of a big tax base and about regulation of natural resource extraction and industry if jurisdiction remains with tribes.

Most of Oklahoma’s oil and gas production is in the western part of the state, but some fields are in the eastern part of the state.

The EPA will take comment on its withdrawal proposal until Jan. 31, 2022.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.

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China bars four from U.S. panel on religious freedom in response to sanctions

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China bars four from U.S. panel on religious freedom in response to sanctions
© Reuters. FILE PHOTO: Chinese and U.S. flags flutter outside a company building in Shanghai, China November 16, 2021. REUTERS/Aly Song

BEIJING (Reuters) -China has barred entry to four people from a U.S. commission on religious freedom, the foreign ministry said on Tuesday, following U.S. sanctions this month against Chinese people and entities over accusations of human rights abuses in Xinjiang.

The four people, from the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF), would be banned from mainland China, Hong Kong and Macau, ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian said.

Their assets in China would also be frozen and Chinese institutions and citizens would be forbidden from dealing with them, Zhao said at a regular briefing in Beijing.

“We are not surprised to see the Chinese government impose additional baseless sanctions in response to growing concern over its egregious human rights and religious freedom violations,” said USCIRF chair Nadine Maenza, one of the people China barred entry to, according to an online statement.

The United States had said that its Dec. 10 sanctions were in response to human rights abuses in China’s Xinjiang region, where Uyghurs and other Muslim minorities are alleged to have been unlawfully detained, mistreated and forced to work. China denies abuses in Xinjiang and says its policies there help combat extremism.

The USCIRF is a federal government entity which evaluates and suggests policies for countries where religious freedom is deemed to be endangered.

Apart from USCIRF’s chair, the sanctions would also affect the vice chair and two commissioners at USCIRF, Zhao said.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.

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White House says action on legislative agenda is urgently needed

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White House says action on legislative agenda is urgently needed
© Reuters. Press Secretary Jen Psaki holds a media briefing at the White House in Washington, U.S., December 14, 2021. REUTERS/Evelyn Hockstein/File Photo

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. President Joe Biden and Democratic Senator Joe Manchin remain on friendly terms despite Manchin’s decision to oppose Biden’s $1.75 trillion Build Back Better plan, White House press secretary Jen Psaki told reporters on Monday.

Psaki said action on Biden’s legislative agenda is urgently needed. She said she would not “relitigate” Manchin’s announcement of opposition on Sunday and her subsequent statement that was sharply critical of him.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.

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