Connect with us

Sports & General

U.S. Supreme Court conservatives signal support for abortion limits

Published

on

2/2
U.S. Supreme Court conservatives signal support for abortion limits
© Reuters. FILE PHOTO: The United States Supreme Court in Washington, U.S., May 17, 2021. REUTERS/Evelyn Hockstein

2/2

By Lawrence Hurley and Andrew Chung

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Conservative U.S. Supreme Court justices on Wednesday indicated support for upholding a restrictive Mississippi abortion law in a ruling that would undermine or outright overturn the landmark 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling legalizing the procedure nationwide.

The court, which has a 6-3 conservative majority, heard about two hours of oral arguments in the southern state’s appeal to revive its ban on abortion starting at 15 weeks of pregnancy, a Republican-backed law blocked by lower courts. During the arguments, the three liberal justices sternly warned against ditching important legal precedents like Roe v. Wade.

Jackson Women’s Health Organization, the only abortion clinic in Mississippi, challenged the law and has the support of Democratic President Joe Biden’s administration. A ruling is expected by the end of next June.

Roe v. Wade recognized that the right to personal privacy under the U.S. Constitution protects a woman’s ability to terminate her pregnancy. The Supreme Court in a 1992 ruling called Planned Parenthood of Southeastern Pennsylvania v. Casey reaffirmed abortion rights and prohibited laws imposing an “undue burden” on abortion access. Mississippi has asked the Supreme Court to overturn the Roe and Casey rulings.

“Why is 15 weeks not enough time” for a woman to decide to have an abortion, Conservative Chief Justice John Roberts asked during the argument.

While Roberts seemed to indicate that the court could uphold the Mississippi law without overturning Roe v. Wade, some of his fellow conservative justices including Justice Neil Gorsuch appeared to be interested in going further.

“The Constitution is neither pro-life nor pro-choice … and leaves the issue to the people to resolve in the democratic process,” said conservative Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

Kavanaugh wondered if the court should be neutral on abortion rights, which would require overturning Roe. If Mississippi wins the case, Kavanaugh added, such a ruling would not prohibit abortion nationwide but would let states regulate it as they see fit.

Julie Rikelman, the lawyer arguing for the abortion clinic that challenged the Mississippi law, said overturning Roe would not mean the court is neutral as it would be saying that even though the Constitution’s protects liberty, women “would never have equal status under the Constitution.”

Mississippi’s is one of a series of restrictive abortion laws passed in Republican-governed states in recent years. The Supreme Court on Nov. 1 heard arguments over a Texas law banning abortion at around six weeks of pregnancy but has not yet issued a ruling.

Liberal Justice Stephen Breyer quoted from the Supreme Court’s Casey ruling, which stated that the court should not bow to political pressure in overturning Roe and that such a ruling would “subvert the court’s legitimacy.”

Liberal Justice Sonia Sotomayor questioned Mississippi’s lawyer Scott Stewart on whether if Roe were overturned then other major precedents including those on gay rights might also be threatened.

“The issue of when life begins has been hotly debated by philosophers since the beginning of time,” Sotomayor said. “It’s still debated in religions. So when you say this is the only right that takes away from the state the ability to protect a life, that’s a religious view, isn’t it, because it assumes that a fetus is life?”

Anti-abortion advocates believe they are closer than ever to overturning Roe, a longstanding goal for Christian conservatives.

Sotomayor said Mississippi brought its new challenge purely because of changes on the Supreme Court, which has become more conservative.

“Will this institution survive the stench this creates?” Sotomayor asked, saying that it would give the impression that the Constitution and its interpretation is based purely on politics. “If people think it is all political … how will the court survive?”

Conservative justices downplayed the idea that the court must be careful in overturning its own precedents, noting that it has done that in many notable contexts including overturning a notorious 1895 ruling that allowed racial segregation.

“There are circumstances in which a decision … must be overruled simply because it was egregiously wrong at the moment it was decided,” conservative Justice Samuel Alito said.

Roberts expressed some skepticism about overturning precedents, noting that “it’s going to be a long list” of past rulings that the justices currently might think were incorrectly decided.

Liberal Justice Elena Kagan cited the importance of the court adhering to precedent “to prevent people from thinking this court is a political institution that will go back and forth depending on what part of the public yells the loudest and preventing the people from thinking the court will go back and forth based on the court’s membership.”

FETAL VIABILITY

The Roe and Casey decisions determined that states cannot ban abortion before a fetus is viable outside the womb, generally viewed by doctors as between 24 and 28 weeks.

A 15-week ban is not a “dramatic departure from viability,” Roberts said.

Mississippi’s 15-week ban directly challenged the viability finding. In the 1992 Casey ruling, the court said Roe’s “central holding” was that viability was the earliest point at which states could ban abortion.

“The right of a woman to choose, the right to control her own body, has been clearly set since Casey and never challenged. You want us to reject that line of viability and adopt something different,” Sotomayor told Stewart.

Mississippi is among 12 states with so-called trigger laws designed to ban abortion if Roe v. Wade is overturned. Additional states also likely would move quickly to curtail abortion access.

Hundreds of protesters from both sides of the abortion debate rallied outside the court ahead of the arguments.

If Roe were overturned or limited, large swathes of America could return to an era in which women who want to end a pregnancy face the choice of undergoing a potentially dangerous illegal abortion, traveling long distances to a state where the procedure remains legal and available or buying abortion pills online. The procedure would remain legal in liberal-leaning states, with 15 having laws protecting abortion rights.

Sports & General

U.S. to allow waiving of in-person interviews for H-1B, other visas through 2022

Published

on

2/2
U.S. to allow waiving of in-person interviews for H-1B, other visas through 2022
© Reuters. FILE PHOTO: The U.S. flag is seen at the Cordova Americas border bridge in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, March 26, 2020. Picture taken on March 26, 2020 REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez

2/2

(Reuters) -The United States will allow its consular officers to waive in-person interviews for H-1B and other certain non-immigrant visa applicants through next year to help reduce visa wait times, the State Department said on Thursday.

“The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in profound reductions in the department’s visa processing capacity,” it said in a statement. “As global travel rebounds, we are taking these temporary steps to further our commitment to safely and efficiently reduce visa wait times while maintaining national security as our priority.”

The consular officers will now be temporarily authorized to waive in-person interviews for nearly a dozen visa categories, including Persons in Specialty Occupations (H-1B visas), visas for students, temporary agricultural and non-agricultural workers, student exchange visitors, as well as athletes, artists and entertainers.

The full list of visa categories in which the appointment now could be waived can be found here https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/News/visas-news/important-announcement-on-waivers-of-the-interview-requirement-for-certain-nonimmigrant-visas.html.

State Department also said it has extended indefinitely the authorization to waive the in-person interview for applicants renewing a visa in the same visa class within 48 months of the prior visa’s expiration.

U.S. State Department in March 2020 had suspended all routine visa services in most countries worldwide due to the coronavirus outbreak. While the services have been reinstated with a limited capacity and on a priority basis, months-long wait times for certain visa appointments persist due to a massive backlog.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.

Continue Reading

Sports & General

Writer Joan Didion, chronicler of contemporary American society, dies at 87

Published

on

2/2
Writer Joan Didion, chronicler of contemporary American society, dies at 87
© Reuters. FILE PHOTO: Writer Joan Didion is escorted to her seat after U.S. President Barack Obama awarded her the 2012 National Humanities Medal during a ceremony at the White House in Washington July 10, 2013. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

2/2

(Refiles to restore missing words to lede)

(Reuters) -Author Joan Didion, whose essays, memoirs, novels and screenplays chronicled contemporary American society, as well as her grief over the deaths of her husband and daughter, has died at the age of 87.

The cause of death was Parkinson’s disease, her publisher Knopf said on Thursday in a statement.

Didion first emerged as a writer of substance in the late 1960s as an early practitioner of “new journalism,” which allowed writers to take a narrative, more personalized perspective.

Her 1968 essay collection “Slouching Toward Bethlehem,” a title borrowed from poet William Butler Yeats, looked at the culture of her native California. The title essay offered an unsympathetic view of the emerging hippie culture in San Francisco and a New York Times review called the book “some of the finest magazine pieces published by anyone in this country in recent years.”

Didion had an air of casual glamour and writerly cool and in her heyday frequently was typically photographed in oversized sunglasses or lounging nonchalantly with a cigarette dangling from a hand. She was 80 in 2015 when the French fashion house Celine used her as a model in an ad campaign for its sunglasses.

Tragedy inadvertently led to a career resurgence in the 2000s as Didion wrote of the deaths of her husband, writer John Gregory Dunne, in “The Year of Magical Thinking” and daughter Quintana Roo Dunne in “Blue Nights.”

Didion’s works were insightful, confessional and tinged with ennui and skepticism. The Los Angeles Times praised her as an “unparalleled stylist” with “piercing insights and exquisite command of language.”

British writer Martin Amis referred to Didion as the “poet of the Great Californian Emptiness” and she was especially incisive in writing about the state. Her 1970 novel “Play It as It Lays” showed Los Angeles, through the eyes of a troubled actor, to be glamorous and vapid while the 2003 essay collection “Where I Was From” was about the culture of the state, as well as herself and her family’s long history there.

“I write entirely to find out what I’m thinking, what I’m looking at, what I see and what it means,” Didion said in a speech at her alma mater, the University of California in Berkeley, in 1975.

FROM CALIFORNIA TO NEW YORK

Her life and career were captured in the 2017 documentary “Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold” by her nephew, actor-filmmaker Griffin Dunne. The New Yorker magazine called the film, which borrowed its title from another Yeats work, “an intimate, affectionate, and partial portrait.”

Didion ended up in New York by winning a college essay contest that provided an internship at Vogue magazine in the late 1950s. She met Dunne there two years later.

Didion and Dunne, who were married nearly 40 years, split their lives between Southern California and New York and managed to be leading figures in both literary circles and Hollywood. The parties at their Malibu beach house, where Harrison Ford worked as a carpenter before “Star Wars” fame, drew crowds that included singer Janis Joplin, moviemakers Steven Spielberg, Brian De Palma and Martin Scorsese and actor Warren Beatty, who was reportedly infatuated with Didion.

Dunne was demonstrative and garrulous while Didion could come off as introverted. Their marriage was rocky at times and Dunne moved to Las Vegas for a while. In an essay in “The White Album,” Didion wrote that they once took a vacation in Hawaii “in lieu of filing for divorce.”

Through it all they edited each other’s work and collaborated on screenplays for the 1976 remake of “A Star Is Born,” “The Panic in Needle Park,” the 1971 film that gave Al Pacino his first starring role, as well as the movie adaptations of “Play It as It Lays” and Dunne’s novel “True Confessions.”

The couple moved to New York in 1988 and after Dunne suffered a heart attack at the dinner table in 2003, Didion wrote of the ensuing heartache in “The Year of Magical Thinking,” which won the National Book Award for Nonfiction.

“Grief turns out to be a place none of us know until we reach it,” she wrote.

Twenty months after Dunne’s death, Didion returned to the place of grief when Quintana Roo died from acute pancreatitis after a series of health problems, which she chronicled in “Blue Nights.”

The diminutive Didion dwindled to 75 pounds (34 kg) after the deaths but began to come out of it by working on a one-woman stage version of “Magical Thinking” that opened on Broadway in 2007 with Vanessa Redgrave starring and David Hare directing.

Didion, whose other books included the novel “A Book of Common Prayer” and non-fiction works “Miami” and “Salvador” was presented the National Medal of Arts in 2013 by President Barack Obama.

Continue Reading

Sports & General

American writer Joan Didion dies at 87 – NYT

Published

on

2/2
American writer Joan Didion dies at 87 - NYT
© Reuters. FILE PHOTO: Writer Joan Didion is escorted to her seat after U.S. President Barack Obama awarded her the 2012 National Humanities Medal during a ceremony at the White House in Washington July 10, 2013. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

2/2

(Reuters) – Author Joan Didion, whose essays, memoirs, novels and screenplays chronicled contemporary society, as well as her grief over the deaths of her husband and daughter, has died at the age of 87, the New York Times reported on Thursday.

The cause of death was Parkinson’s disease, the newspaper said, citing an email by Didion’s publisher.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.

Continue Reading

News

Uncategorized21 mins ago

Damage in tsunami-hit Tonga hampering relief efforts

Uncategorized21 mins ago

Oil rises to more than 7-year high on Mideast tensions

Uncategorized21 mins ago

U.S. Senate panel to debate app store reform bill

Uncategorized51 mins ago

Asian Stocks Up, Investors Continue Monitoring COVID-19 Recovery but See “Positive

Uncategorized51 mins ago

N.Korea tested tactical guided missiles in fresh sign of evolving arsenal

Uncategorized51 mins ago

Bitcoin price can’t find its footing, but BTC fundamentals inspire confidence in traders

Uncategorized51 mins ago

United Airlines warns 5G plan would impact 1.25 million passengers a year

Uncategorized51 mins ago

Asia shares tick higher as spotlight stays on Fed

Uncategorized1 hour ago

Brent Crude Trades Near Highest Since 2014 on Tightening Market

Uncategorized1 hour ago

North Korea tested tactical guided missiles on Monday – KCNA

Uncategorized1 hour ago

Gold Steady as Investors Weigh Policy Outlook, Omicron Risks

Uncategorized1 hour ago

Panther protocol co-founder Oliver Gale discusses bringing zero-knowledge technology to multi-chain

403 Forbidden You don’t have permission to access /news/cryptocurrency-news/panther-protocol-cofounder-oliver-gale-discusses-bringing-zeroknowledge-technology-to-multichain-2740735 on this server. Apache/2.4.6 (CentOS) Server at www.investing.com Port 80

Uncategorized1 hour ago

Dollar fails to catch a lift from higher yields, Bank of Japan in focus

Uncategorized1 hour ago

Bank Indonesia to hold rates until second half of 2022 despite hawkish Fed

Uncategorized1 hour ago

Australia suffers deadliest day of pandemic as Omicron drives up hospital cases

Uncategorized2 hours ago

Oil Climbs With Geopolitical Unrest Returning as Market Tightens

Uncategorized2 hours ago

Propy rallies 227% as real estate NFTs become reality and PRO lists at Coinbase

Uncategorized3 hours ago

Explainer-Tonga’s volcanic eruption may harm environment for years, scientists say

Uncategorized3 hours ago

U.S. appeals court delays legal challenge to Texas abortion law

Uncategorized3 hours ago

After flying start, Stellantis must tackle Tesla and China

Uncategorized3 hours ago

Damage on tsunami-hit Tonga’s main island hampering relief efforts

Uncategorized3 hours ago

Australian consumers shellshocked as Omicron hits spending, growth

Uncategorized3 hours ago

Brazil’s Bolsonaro to visit Suriname and Guayana for talks on oil cooperation

Uncategorized3 hours ago

Major U.S. airline CEOs warn 5G could ground some planes, wreak havoc

Uncategorized3 hours ago

Law Decoded: First-mover advantage in a CBDC conversation, Jan. 10–17

Uncategorized4 hours ago

Snowstorm strands motorists, grounds planes in eastern U.S., Canada

Uncategorized4 hours ago

From tuk tuks to COVID tests, YouTuber tests Bitcoin use cases across multiple countries

Uncategorized5 hours ago

Down, but not out: Here’s why Theta could be a breakout star in 2022

Uncategorized5 hours ago

Lawsuit against Amazon filed in tornado swarm that left 6 dead in Illinois warehouse

Uncategorized5 hours ago

Significant damage reported on Tonga’s main island after volcanic eruption

Trending